Cool Tools

Got skunked on my first 14hour shift last night, but got to spend some time playing/learning about equipment that is new to me. Making sure you know your equipment well before heading out on calls prevents you from looking like an arse on scene. 😀  Summary: Getting to play with stuff + Reduced Risk of looking like an A**= Win.

Cool Tool #1: AutoPulse by Zoll

The AutoPulse does exactly what the name implies. It automates chest compressions.

Why it’s cool…

-prevents CPR providers from having to stand to perform compressions during transport (medic safety)

-prevents provider fatigue (medic saftey)

-regulates compression rate/depth (improves patient outcome)

-distributes compression force evenly as opposed to manual CPR which pinpoints the sternum (better CPR, faster recovery time)

-idiot proof design (idiot prevention)

-provides more time to focus on ACLS

-won’t hurt a live person

Cool Tool #2: Stryker Evacuation Chair

A stair chair with tracks. Enough said.

Why it’s cool…

-reduces risk of provider injury, especially those back injuries I mentioned (medic safety)

-reduces risk of patient injury (patient safety)

-can be wheeled like a wheel chair opposed to rear wheels only models (patient safety/comfort)

-can be operated by one provider (I wouldn’t recommend this, although I did get to try it on my supervisor last night!)

-patient foot rest (patient safety/comfort)

Nothing is perfect

-weighs more than traditional model

-tracks not well designed for going up stairs

-for a smooth ride it takes practice/coordination when first getting onto stairs

Cool Tool #3: Head Immobilizer Laerdal 

L983090

Also known as Speed Blocks. Replaces towel rolls and tape for cervical splinting.

Why it’s cool…

-no fighting with tape rolls!!!!!! (idiot proof- my preceptor will appreciate that comment.)

-capable of splinting cervical spine that is angulated (patient safety)

-environmentally friendly (all parts can be cleaned and reused except for velcro strips)

-no eyebrow wax jobs (patient comfort)

-smaller design provides better access to patient (better patient care)

-does not impede patient’s hearing

Stay safe out there!

Vanessa

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