A Note from Medic15’s Life Partner

598795_10151182296303476_442009149_n

First off I am not Medic15, and my writing ability is substantially less involving and captivating than hers, but I live with Medic15. Actually better to say I am engaged to her. I am writing this blog for all of you out there wondering what it is like to date/be married to a working EMS professional as well as a paramedic student.

My journey started in April of 2012 when I relocated to live with my girlfriend. As mentioned above she was a paramedic student at the time. I secretly thought living in the same house would help me get on the same page with the new language she was speaking: hypothalamic, epinephrine, ischemia, etc. Boy was I wrong. Even though I tried to pay attention and learn something about my future wives dream job, there was just some lingo I couldn’t grasp.

It got worse when we had people over (friends from her school). I’d spend half my night nodding in agreement about things I didn’t know existed.  For example, this is what their conversations sounded like to me: “Student#1 – How did you do on that scenario? Student#2- The AFib bronchial aortic spine tap patient where I forgot to clear Cspine?? Student#1- Yea and nebbed 8 mg of Nitro Ventolin.”  I’d be sitting in the corner nodding my head, ya, that is exactly what I would have done. (?)

Not only is dating a medic hard because of the constant medical terms flying around, but it is also such a male dominated field that my girlfriend was the only female in a class of roughly 20 people. If you are thinking of dating a female medic, be prepared to be jealous. I will say if you want to be with someone in the medical field you have to be very understanding, and there has to be plenty of trust on both sides of this fence.

If you’re dating a medic, being physically fit is also a top priority. So not only was she hanging out with dudes, she was hanging out with fit dudes. This actually made us both feel insecure at times, but for different reasons. To help ease the tension, I joined my partner at a gym and did a lot of hiking together. We also loaded a backpack with around 100lbs of sand and walked the block. So also be prepared to be as fit as your partner. It is definitely a great bonding experience.

Now that my fiancée is a working paramedic everything is everything gravy? Well sometimes the jealousy factor is still there. She works long shifts with partner’s she has a lot more in common with then myself. And then there is that uniform. People say they look better with a uniform on and after seeing Medic15 in hers, I totally agree. I’m drifting off topic here now.

ALARM BEEP BEEP BEEP ALARM CAR 26 ON ROUTE REGIONAL 10-4.

This pager is the next thing I have to discuss. The first time you hear your partners radio go off it will literally scare the pants off you (and her). I had to check mine. It’s only taken 2 weeks to get used to it. Luckily, I’m a deep sleeper so it doesn’t bother me too much when she is getting up at all hours of the night.

Honestly, other then those few issues I wouldn’t have it any other way. I value the knowledge I have learned just by being around her and her friends, the bonding experiences we have had, and the fact that my significant other improves lives on a daily basis.

I hope the insight from my life will help anyone out there that is dating or looking to date someone in the paramedical community.

Sincerely,

Medic15’s  partner.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “A Note from Medic15’s Life Partner

  1. Well medic15’s life partner, your writing skills are way better than mine and I enjoyed this blog haha. Both of you keep it up!

  2. Will, you forgot mention all the love and support and patience (patients??) and understanding you provided Vanessa while she was in school, on her placement and while
    preparing to write her provincial exam. I’m sure this was a huge factor in her success. Thank you. I’m sure you are both richer for the experience. Together, the pair of you are heading in a great direction. Jennie

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s